Energy & Environmental

On February 12, 2019, Representative Tina Davis introduced a bill proposing to establish a new regulatory commission with oversight over municipal water and wastewater authorities.   H.B. 494 would establish a Municipal Water and Wastewater Authority Oversight Commission (“Authority Commission”).  Representative Davis previously sponsored H.B. 798, which would have amended the Public Utility Code to subject municipal water and wastewater authorities to regulation by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (“PUC”).  Introduced in 2017, H.B. 798 failed to move out of the Consumer Affairs Committee. Continue Reading New House Proposal Would Subject Municipal Water, Wastewater Authorities to Additional Oversight

Republican Representative Garth Everett, in a cosponsorship memorandum posted on February 1st, announced plans to reintroduce a package of bills that would expand the ability of municipalities throughout Pennsylvania to assess stormwater management fees. These proposals, contained in former House Bills 913 through 916 (2017-2018 session), died in the Senate last term after being passed with bipartisan support by the House. Continue Reading Stormwater Fee Proposals Reintroduced in Pennsylvania General Assembly

On October 11, 2018, the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania (“Court”) vacated the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (“PUC”) Order approving the acquisition of the wastewater system assets of New Garden Township and New Garden Sewer Authority (collectively “New Garden”) by Aqua Pennsylvania Wastewater, Inc. (“Aqua”).[1]  Aqua’s Application sought PUC approval of the acquisition, a Certificate of Public Convenience to furnish wastewater service to customers in and around the service territory of New Garden, and, approval of a rate base predicated on the acquisition price, rate commitments and transaction costs.[2] Continue Reading Commonwealth Court Requires Reexamination of PA Monetization Deal

On May 23, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives approved Senate Bill 234, which creates the Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Program. SB 234, which was approved by the Senate in January of this year, would help owners of agricultural, commercial and industrial properties obtain low-cost, long-term financing for energy efficiency, water conservation and renewable energy projects. The program would not include multifamily housing or other residential property. Continue Reading Pennsylvania Legislature Approves New Municipal Alternative Energy Program

Sewage backups tend to make relationships between landowners and their municipal sewer authorities rather, well, messy.  When property is impacted by a sewer authority’s negligence, landowners would typically find a remedy in a trespass action.  However, a recent decision by the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania holds that repeated sewage backups may cause a de facto taking under the Pennsylvania Eminent Domain code, requiring compensation to the landowner.  This is yet another area of concern and possible liability for municipal authority operators. Continue Reading Sewer Authorities Could Owe Compensation for Repeated Sewage Overflows

Across much of the United States, the number of municipalities imposing stormwater management fees upon property owners has increased dramatically in recent years.  The rising prevalence of stormwater management fees has predictably led to local and state court challenges by businesses, as non-residential property owners are typically more severely impacted by stormwater management fees in comparison to residential property owners.  Affected businesses have questioned whether parcel-based stormwater fees constitute legitimate fees for services rendered or are simply revenue-generating taxes in disguise.

State courts have issued conflicting rulings on this question.  In the heartland, the Supreme Court of Missouri issued a 2013 decision striking down stormwater management fees and requiring municipalities to fund stormwater management programs through tax revenues.  In the northeast, the Supreme Court of Maine conversely issued a 2012 decision affirming a stormwater management fee program as a fee for services rendered.

It now appears that Pennsylvania jurisdictions will have an opportunity to weigh-in on this critical debate.  In January 2018, the Chester Business Association filed injunctions seeking to block imposition of a stormwater management fee proposed by the Stormwater Authority of Chester.  Similarly, an attorney and property owner in the city of New Castle filed a complaint with the Lawrence County Court of Common Pleas requesting that the court void stormwater management fees to be collected by the New Castle Sanitation Authority.

While the outcome of these cases remains uncertain, any decisions in these jurisdictions may not be dispositive as to rulings in other Pennsylvania jurisdictions, as stormwater management fees are complex and can be developed based on a variety of different models.  For both municipalities and businesses impacted by stormwater management fees, effective stakeholder engagement can ensure that legitimate stormwater management fees serve their intended purpose and avoid overly burdening property owners.  Attorneys at McNees can assist with review, analysis, and if necessary, litigation of stormwater management fees.

As we prepare to say goodbye to 2017 and welcome a new year, we thought we’d take a moment and revisit some of our favorite stories from the last twelve months that we’ve followed on the McNees Public Sector Blog.

To all our readers – thanks for visiting! And may you all have a happy and prosperous new year!

– Tim Horstmann

Monetization is the process of converting assets into economic value. Looking for options to generate greater revenue, municipalities and public sector entities have begun to consider the transfer to private operators of a greater variety of public assets than in the past. There has also been the development recently of more creative and profitable public-private partnerships. Continue Reading Generating Value from Public Assets

A bill introduced by Representative Kate Harper (R-Montgomery) would impose a new public meeting requirement on municipalities considering selling or leasing their water or sewer systems. The bill was recently approved in the House unanimously, and has been referred to the Senate Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Committee.

House Bill 477 would require municipalities to hold at least one public meeting prior to entering into an agreement to sell or lease a municipal-owned or operated water or sewer system. The bill would also apply to systems operated by municipal authorities, if the transaction contemplated the dissolution of the authority by the municipality. The meeting would have to be advertised at least twice, on successive weeks, not more than 60 nor fewer than 7 days before the date of the meeting. If the system served customers outside of the municipality considering the sale or lease, public notice would also have to be provided in the municipalities where those customers resided.

Additionally, the potential purchaser or lessee of the system would be required to attend the meeting – presumably to present its plans for the system and to answer questions.

In the event the Senate acts favorably on the proposal, and the Governor signs it, the new public meeting requirement would go into effect in 60 days. Municipalities considering selling or leasing their water or sewer systems should keep a close eye on the status of House Bill 477 to ensure they comply with its requirements in the event it become law.

McNees attorneys Tim Horstmann, Ade Bakare and Kathy Pape recently provided an update on municipal storm water management to the membership of the Pennsylvania State Association of Boroughs. Their presentation addressed recent changes in Pennsylvania laws governing municipal storm water management in boroughs, permissible user fee structures, and additional funding streams that are available to municipalities to pay for necessary projects.

Interested in learning more? A copy of the Power Point presentation is available online.